Tag Archives: values

Millennials, A Different View on Home Ownership?

 

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Millennial is the name which generally has been used to identify a generation of people who were born in the 1980s and 1990s. Most of us have experienced tales from people of generations who went before us  as they reminisce about “the good old days” while lamenting the loss of the lifestyle of their generation.  For many generations, home ownership has been considered part of the American Dream.  Should we always assume what worked in the past will work now, or in the future? 

Some millennials don’t think so and  are making  non-traditional decisions about their living and housing arrangements.  This interesting article from Zillow.com describes millennials who are opting out of home ownership and seeking other housing options.   Often it is a decision based on financial need, but not always.  It can also be because of a desire for easy mobility, or just being comfortable living in a community-like atmosphere.

Perhaps the  accepted definition of the American Dream is  being rewritten and revised by this generation of consumers.  An interesting concept and a fascinating article.

 

 

 

Beyond Football, One Man’s Values and Goals Change

John Moffitt walks away from NFL, 1 million

This is the title of an article which was posted in November 2013, about a Denver Broncos player.  I captured the link for later blog postings.  All this Super Bowl hype has me thinking later has now come.

My blogs are really targeted to women. Writing about a sport in which women can’t actively participate (as in being on the field as a player) isn’t at the top of my list.  I recognize that many women enjoy professional sports just as much as their spouses, children, families, and friends do. I will admit that even this year I have actually watched a lot of football because teams from my home town (the Kansas City area) and where I lived for most of my adult life (the Denver area) had great seasons.  Of course, in the end, Denver earned their way to the Super Bowl, so I am getting lots of Facebook communications from my Colorado friends.  Yes, I will be watching the Super Bowl this year, for the first time in a long time.

Thinking about the current elevated attention on football made me more conscious of the extraordinary amount of money which is involved in the sport, the enhanced concerns by the  football league about the potential long-term health problems for players, and the high value much of our society holds for professional athletes.  Clearly there is a lot of hero-worship going on in the business of professional football.  It isn’t routine for a player to simply walk away from the sport, and in this case, from a team which translated Super Bowl potential in November 2013 into a Super Bowl invitation in January 2014.

The story about John Moffitt (click here to read) is a profound and positive example of how a person’s values and goals can change and evolve.  This is one man’s story of recognizing those changes and making some unconventional decisions to live his life the way he feels is appropriate.  A professional football  player opting out to protect his health and align his career with his values is not the normal news story in professional sports.

It is wonderful to learn from the examples of others about grounding a life based on personal values and establishing, or re-establishing, goals to live in support of those values.

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When I watch the Broncos play and listen to the sportscasters introduce the players and their stats, I will be thinking about John Moffitt and wondering what new goals he has set for his life, and what stats he has decided are now most important to him.

Until next time.

Debra Hadsall

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Slave to the Grind

I picked up one of the local free papers and enjoyed reading the editor’s note called “Slave to the Grind”.  That got my attention, having been there a time or two.  Haven’t we all?

This is a great real life story of values, finances, work, family,and a Personal Legend (a concept mentioned in my last post).  We learn so much from the successes of others.

I also appreciate the re-publishing of the newspaper article about my Financial Freedom Party (FFP) for Women.

Please click here to read the “Slave to the Grind” article by Ray Quiroga.

The original article about FFP can be read here.

Until next time.

Debra Hadsall

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Personal Legend

I am in a book club. There are a lot of great things about this book club. First, there are only seven of us in the club and we are learning a lot about each other.  We are a collection of women with differing views on lots of things; but we agree to be open to learning and accept that it is OK to disagree. We all do agree that being in book club expands our reading list to include books we might not have considered before, or even knew existed. I should mention that we live in the Port Isabel/South Padre Island, Texas, area which is on the Gulf of Mexico. Several of the group members have homes on the bay or live on the “island”. The scenery we experience while discussing books is pretty spectacular. We indulge in food and beverages (including adult beverages) which relate to the book.  On occasion a book doesn’t have much of a food theme or even much mention of food, so we freelance and use it as an excuse to make margaritas or have a bottle of wine.

The book we read and discussed this month is The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. I had never heard of this book, even though it was published 10 years ago. Maybe I wasn’t keeping up on international authors, Paulo Coelho is from Brazil. Perhaps the title made me think of some science project and I don’t find it easy to wrap my brain around chemistry. Whatever the reason, I have now discovered the Alchemist with its spiritual tale of Personal Legends, challenges, hope, perseverance, love, and life. You may ask, what does this book and the concept of a Personal Legend have to do with a blog about financial freedom.  I say everything!

How we live and create our lives spiritually, professionally, financially, and with our family and friends is part of our Personal Legend. It is easy to think of great leaders and public figures as having Personal Legends. For example, when we think of Abraham Lincoln, we see his Personal Legend as changing the United States in a profound and long-lasting way. Well, we all aren’t going to be like Abraham Lincoln, but we do have the opportunity to create our lives and our Personal Legends.

I see a Personal Legend as a clever and profound way of describing an individual’s values, goals, and dreams.  It seems stronger, clearer, and more forceful than talking about destiny.

So what does this have to do with financial management?   A Personal Legend is a key component of a financial life.

The first question I would ask a person when meeting with her or him about finances was “What are your goals and dreams”? I didn’t ask how much money she or he earned, how much is spent, occupation, or credit card debt amounts, and other traditional financial information. The answers to those questions are part of the picture, but tend to reflect where a person has been or may be at the moment.

To some, goals and dreams seem like flakey esoteric terms. Ideally they are the first part of financial management.  Paulo Coelho reminds us that “… wherever your heart is, that is where you will find your treasure”.  The term treasure reaches beyond just the traditional capitalist view of something of intrinsic value.  Understanding what is valuable, or a treasure, differs from person to person. This means the traditional text-book financial management practices may not work for everyone.  Some people value stability over adventure, others value control of their time over big paychecks, while many value material goods over long-term financial security.

I have met people who value their faith above personal comfort, others who place more value on caring for family members than on their own needs, and some who could live a “big lifestyle”  but choose to give money to those in need. On occasion, I encountered those who treasured money as a symbol of success, power, or status.  These are just a few of the value choices, or treasures, which become the foundation of a Personal Legend.

A person who invests in understanding what is important on a personal level can then make conscious decisions to use his or her resources consistent with his or her values, goals and dreams.  This can be tricky in a world which constantly markets an overwhelming number of consumer products and services which promise to fulfill our dreams.  That is why I see a relationship between a Personal Legend and personal financial management.  They fit together.  Through his writing in The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho tells a wonderful story and subtly pushes the reader to thinking about her or his Personal Legend.  Nice!

Until next time.

Debra Hadsall

 

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