Category Archives: pay equity

My Monkey Mind- Women in Commerce, Marijuana and Shades of Nancy Botwin

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My monkey mind postings relate to Buddha’s description of the human mind as being filled with drunken monkeys, jumping around, screeching, chattering, and carrying on endlessly. These postings come from my monkey mind.

Yesterday my Monkey Mind connected Nancy Botwin (a fictional character), ways to improve financial lives by making more money, and women in commerce in the legal pot industry in Colorado.  I am not posting about whether or not legalized marijuana is appropriate, only about where my Monkey Mind took me recently.

Colorado has legalized the growing and sale of recreational marijuana, with limitations.  I lived in Colorado for most of my adult life and have family and friends there.  Recently I was staying with my  adult son and he opened the freezer, took out a small bag of marijuana, and asked if I wanted some.  Then we laughed.  Pot has never been my deal or his. The bag has been there for six months.  The humorous part was he was having this conversation with his mother and all of a sudden that which was forbidden and usually hidden, was now OK (limited amounts of course) and out for all to see.

He and I have our mother and son bonding over cable TV shows like Sons of Anarchy, Breaking Bad, Nip Tuck, and my all-time favorite, Weeds.  If you don’t know, Weeds is the  fictional story of Nancy Botwin, a widow with two children and a big need for big income.  She is not a perfect person and her decision to deal weed is one of love, violence,  greed, corruption, survival, decisions, sex, and commerce.  It is also the story of a woman in an industry run by men and a mother’s concern for providing for her children.  Quite an interesting combination.

The last episodes show how over time she made the jump from being a criminal dealing drugs to a woman of commerce with a chain of very successful stores selling pot edibles.  How did this happen?  The story line put her in a world where weed had been legalized.  I loved the ending since it showed Nancy as the owner of a very large, very legal, and  very legitimate business.  My son didn’t share my enthusiasm.  I suspect he was looking for the crazy violence prone Nancy to rise again.  Instead it was a story of  closure and commerce .

This week I did a posting titled Three Ways to Improve Your Financial Life.  One of these ways to make more.  I am always fascinated by how we as women find ways to make more for ourselves and our families.  So, when CBS This Morning did a segment on women in Colorado who are in the  legalized marijuana industry, are making money, reaching out to each other, and getting a piece of the action, I thought of Nancy Botwin and the idea of making more money.

In the  CBS video, a woman is shown in a commercial  kitchen  preparing pot goodies.  She is not a Food Network star or a well-known chef, the way most women in kitchens come to us via our television.  I doubt that she is highly paid or wealthy…yet.  She is a woman doing commerce in the legalized pot industry in Colorado. I thought, finally a way for women who can cook and/or grow things and also run a business to make a real living. This is big business and one where women are already finding a way to connect with other women to define the industry and benefit financially from their efforts. The segment can be viewed at http://www.cbsnews.com/news/making-the-marijuana-business-women-friendly

I remember that after I viewed the final season of Weeds, I mentioned to my husband that maybe I should get into the pot business some day when it is legalized more widely.  He laughed and reminded me that most plants I care for die and that although I make amazing cookies, my long-term ability to whip up delicious pot treats doesn’t exist.  So I will just watch from the sideline as those pioneering Colorado women lead the way.

Until next time.

Debra Hadsall

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Before the Kardashians

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Today, while channel surfing, I was lucky enough to land on the HBO channel which was showing a documentary about Gloria Steinem.  Lucky because most of the attention on other channels was focused on current media favorites, the Kardashians.

I used to assume that most women know about Gloria Steinem, Ms. Magazine, Bella Abzug, and others in the women’s movement which gained momentum in the 1970s.  Whatever you may have felt, or still feel about this time of great change, the results of the efforts of Gloria Steinem and others around her have had a significant impact on the personal, professional, and financial lives of women.

Recently I have begun to wonder if the young women of today are being taught about powerful and successful women who have helped us to arrive at where we are today.  Have they heard the names of Gloria Steinem and Oprah Winfrey as often as they experience minute-by-minute reporting on the Kardashians?

Gloria Steinem is now in her late 70s and it is understandable that not all young women have studied much about her, yet.  However, I just assumed that everyone who is old enough to watch television or surf the internet would know about Oprah Winfrey.  Not true.  Recently I was visiting with a group of young women who are in high school.  I discovered they really don’t know who Oprah is, what she has accomplished, or even how rich she is.That is interesting since rich is usually something teens care about. This lack of awareness of Oprah was a big surprise.  Fortunately I have listened to Oprah’s story often enough to recite it to them.  After that, I started bringing a few copies of O Magazine so the students could learn more.  In another conversation, I discovered that each of them could immediately identify Kim Kardashian and knew all about the man in her life, Kanye West.  Major reality check for me!

It is exciting that the blogosphere allows the writer to reach out to people of many generations all over the world.  If you are reading this and find that you are clueless as to who Gloria Steinem is, or what she stands for, please just “google her” or even watch her story on HBO.  Perhaps you have only a passing understanding of Oprah Winfrey’s life and accomplishments. Once again, a quick google will teach you a lot. 

I am grateful we are no longer living in the times when Gloria and Oprah were starting out and leading their own special brand of change for women, but I do know it is important to understand the past to appreciate today!

Until next time.

Debra Hadsall

www.financialfreedomparty.com

www.ffptalk.com

I Am Celebrating!

Recently I read about a study which tells the story of under-representation of women as financial advisors, and describes the lower level of earnings of women advisors as opposed to that of men.

Clearly I am not celebrating those statistics.  I am, however, so very excited and grateful to see that someone has actually studied the situation and brought it out for all to see.  As part of the development of The Financial Freedom Party for Women, I searched high and low for any type of information about the brokerage and financial advisory industries and the level of representation by women.  Not a successful search at the time.

So, to learn more, please click here to read my article titled “I AM CELEBRATING!”

It is always nice to understand the industries we rely upon to either to provide us with services, or as employers and business partners. I hope you will learn a little about the financial services industry from my article.

Until next time.

Debra Hadsall

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www.financialfreedomparty.com

www.ffptalk.com

The Power of Those Who Open Doors for Others

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I blog about women, money, and the Financial Freedom Party for Women.  Most of the time I write about basic financial information for topics such as life insurance, long-term care insurance, investing, wills, debt, goals, values,  and expense management.  There is an additional important topic which really is part of the foundation of our financial lives, income management.   Most of us need to make money to have money to manage and spend, right? Income management starts with income.

Making a living, or earning income, really means we trade our time and skills (or expertise) for money to buyers.  Explaining all the potential buyers would fill this page.  So, an example of a buyer is an employer in a business or organization.  As a business owner, a buyer could be an external customer who purchases goods or services.  The value of what we earn is directed mainly by the marketplace.  You know the term, supply and demand.  Sometimes earning income is also greatly affected by the attitudes and experiences of those who “buy” from us and the culture and norms of the business or organization.

It is estimated in the United States that women make 78 cents for every dollar earned by men.  This doesn’t mean the world of buyers owes us as women a better living, or that someone owes us more money.  It does mean that we have to be willing to advocate better for ourselves and to take some chances.  Once we gain a little success, we need to reach out and help others. When we open doors for others, we give them a chance to change their lives.

I recently learned that one of my “door openers” passed away.  His name was Roger and he had been an Air Force Officer and an Air Force Academy graduate.  These two experiences formed some of his attitudes, values, and his approach to life.

Our paths crossed when he selected me for a position as a civilian planner in a small command post.  I was not what the high-ranking officers had in mind when they created the position.  They were looking for a retired enlisted man.  I was a younger woman with no military service.  My credentials were great, but I was not the preferred type for the position.

Roger selected me based on my qualifications.  It was a challenge for him to select me.  After all, he had graduated from a class of all male Air Force Cadets.  It wasn’t until a few years later that women were allowed to attend the Air Force Academy.   As time went on he admitted that when he hired me he had some concerns for me and for our work unit.  We answered directly to the Commanding General.  The success or failure of our work was highly visible.  In the beginning I was told by one of my new bosses, also a high-ranking officer, that I was there in spite of his wishes. My normal welcome to the organization was not so welcoming.   I had gotten used to these things and just did my work.  We began passing inspections and getting high ratings on our headquarters reports for my area.  Over time the concerns about me as a woman in that position were no longer aired publicly. I became a respected part of the team.

When I left the position for a promotion, I was replaced by a very capable woman hired by Roger’s replacement.  She and I became close friends and remain so to this day.  I am talking about a 20+ year relationship.  Our careers progressed.  Some folks told the two of us that we were “fast burners”.   I was promoted three times into different positions . Of course promotions equate to more responsibility and more income. Eventually I left the federal government.  My friend stayed, earned promotions,  and went on to a prestigious position which involved her in many interesting assignments and projects throughout the city where we lived.

The legacy of Roger’s career is not about a stellar rise to the top in the military.  He found a better fit elsewhere for his interests, talents, abilities, and considerable brainpower. A new path and lifestyle resulted in a life with a different rhythm and purpose.  Among other things, he earned a Master’s Degree in Architecture and became involved in creative arts.   His legacy is, in part, about the door he opened for me, and then indirectly opened­­ for my friend.  He also led the way in showing those given the title of superiors and subordinates how to judge women and men on their qualifications and contributions, not on their sex.

I thank Roger for showing me that leadership isn’t about bossing people around.  It is about reaching out to others, helping them develop their talents, opening doors, and staying constant when it is easier to just give up and conform.  I think pay equity is more prevalent now for women in many career fields, but it took some men and women to help us along the way. I do not know if women will ever reach a time where we earn dollar for dollar for men.   I am confident it will continue to get better faster if more of us become “door openers”.

I strive to be a “door opener”.  It has become a natural part of my life.  Sometimes I succeed, sometimes I don’t.  However, I have gotten pretty brave about giving it a try.

Please reflect on your life. Are you opening doors for others?  Are you constant in your efforts?  Will your legacy include fond memories from those who enjoyed better lives personally and financially because you took a chance and acted?   As the 78% statistic changes and moves upwards, will you count yourself as part of the process?

Until next time

Debra Hadsall

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www.financialfreedomparty.com